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Guide to Smart Homes for Electrical Installers Edition 2021 (PDF)

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  • Brand: IET
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About

Pages: 202 pages
Size: 82 MB
Publisher: IET
Author (s): IET
Language: English
Date of Publication: 2021

The definition of a smart home is complicated.
For the purposes of this Guide, a smart home is a home that has a layer or layers of technology between the user and the systems within it.

The different varieties of smart home will be illustrated throughout this Guide.
This Guide will help someone with electrical installation skills to identify and organize the elements that need to be incorporated when designing and specifying a smart home containing wired or wireless technology. It will support an electrical installer as they take on the extra duties, possibilities and liabilities entailed in smart home technology installation and support It cannot explain all the technology and processes that might be required, as these are application- and product-specific. Up skilling through training, and manufacturers' guidance, will be required continually, to keep up to date with developments.
This Guide is designed to help you understand what smart home technology is and give you confidence in specifying and installing it.

Smart measures span a whole spectrum of complexity.
Wireless devices performing a single task will not require the same diligence as a fully featured, wired smart home.
This Guide aims to prepare you for the latter and assumes that you will trim your efforts to fit more straightforward projects.

Who is this Guide for?
There is a rapidly growing opportunity for smart home installations in the UK.
Smart homes offer householders a means to secure the latest technology; however, not all the devices are 'plug and play'.
Many require input from competent electrical installers.
That input could be as simple as running a new cable to a new point or installing a power socket with USB (universal serial bus) charging outlets, or it could be the design or reorganization of all the technology in the home. In this Guide, any actions taken that support or facilitate smart devices, or have smart outcomes, will be referred to as 'smart measures'.

The term 'smart measure1 includes smart devices.
It is likely that you, the electrical installer, will be the person called upon to install smart home technology.
Perhaps a 'life moment trigger1 will occur, such as a broken heating programmer.
This is a great opportunity to do something 'smart' that is better for the electrical installer, the client and the environment.
There is huge variation in energy efficiency across British homes.
The UK has a house building programme and an important energy-saving agenda that also incentivizes energy-saving retro-fit measures for our existing buildings.
Live policies pushing for more energy-efficient homes include the Clean Growth Strategy, the Energy Performance of Buildings Directive and the minimum energy efficiency standards.
Signposts to these can be found in Appendix C.

There are already lots of subsidy schemes operated by local authorities and we can expect to see more.
These are likely to require people who have the skills to work with smart technology.
Existing trades with skills and experience that might be transferred into the smart home sector include:
(a) electrical installers; and
(b) fire and security alarm installers

Content

Acknowledgments
Section 1 Introduction
1.2 Who is this Guide for?
1.3 What is different for the smart home installer?
1.4 What is a smart home?
1.5 Smart home benefits
1.6 Making a home future-ready
1.7 Summary
Section 2 An overview of smart home technology
2.1 Defining 'smart'
2.2 Common smart home elements
2.3 User interface (UI)
2.4 Wired or wireless?
2.5 Separated or integrated smartness?
2.6 Benefits of connecting systems within a smart home interoperability and the cloud
2.8 Smart home information and processing
2.9 Software and protocols
2.10 Infrastructure for smart home systems
2.11 Summary
Section 3 How smart home products are applied
3.1 Smart home HE modules
3.2 WiFi and PLC
3.3 Stand-alone consumer tech
3.4 Smart appliances
3.5 A smart or wireless plug
3.6 Motion sensors
3.7 Photocells or brightness sensors
3.8 Door/window open/closed sensors
3.9 Wall button
3.10 Temperature sensor
3.11 Thermal actuator
3.12 Shading: blind, shutter or curtain controllers
3.13 Fire detection
3.14 Security and access equipment
3.15 Energy~monitoring equipment
3.16 Audiovisual (AV) equipment
3.17 Summary
Section 4 Capturing the client's requirements
4.1 Back to the drawing board with the client
4.2 The needs analysis
4.3 The functional analysis
4.4 The survey
4.5 Project documents
4.6 Summary
5 Section 5 Safety aspects of smart home design
5.8 The standard for safety
5.9 The smart home safety challenge
5.10 Designing for safety
5.11 Smart home earthing and bonding
5.12 Smart home equipment segregation
5.13 Shielding and screening in smart home cables and equipment
5.14 Summary
Section 6 Smart home infrastructure
6.1 How the smart home installer job is different to the electrical installer job
6.2 Compatibility
6.3 Topography (layout) of physical components
6.4 Topology (interconnections) of physical components
6.5 Smart home cabling
6.6 Cabling for DC power
6.7 Remote powering (RP) and Power over Ethernet (PoE)
6.8 Cabling for AV and smart home signals
6.9 Cyber security
6.10 System requirements for data
Section 7 Smart home design method 117
7.1 Delegate design and ask a manufacturer to help
7.2 Design documentation
7.3 A bill of materials (BOM)
7.4 The difference when designing a smart home compared with a standard installation
7.5 Your part in the design: where to begin
7.6 A grossly simplified design method
7.7 Realistic questions to ask when realistically designing
7.8 The electrical installer as the (energy-efficient) smart home installer
7.9 Summary
Section 8 How to propose and install smart home equipment
8.1 What is at stake?
8.2 Extra considerations for smart home proposals
8.3 Reasons to continue
8.4 The contract or agreement
8.5 How to install a smart home system
8.6 Documentation
8.7 Installation
8.8 The smart home HE
8.9 Summary
Section 9 How to commission a smart home system
9.1 What is different for the electrical installer when commissioning a smart home?
9.2 Inspection verification, and testing of Fixed wiring and equipment to relevant standards
9.3 Functional commissioning
9.4 Commissioning documentation
9.5 Commissioning summary
9.6 Handover
9.7 The shape of a good handover
9.8 Handover pack documentation
9.9 Conducting the handover
9.10 Handover summary
Section 10 Supporting the smart home
10.1 What is different for the electrical installer supporting smart homes?
10.2 industry-facing support obligations
10.3 Client-facing support opportunities
10.4 How to record support and maintenance
10.5 Summary of the smart home support opportunity
Appendix A Abbreviations and glossary
Appendix B References
Appendix C Suggested further reading and resources
Appendix D Templates
Index

Tags: pdf Guide to Smart Homes, Smart Homes guide, guide to Smart Homes, Smart Homes book, iet Smart Homes

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Reviews (1)
Wiley
Wiley
30/11/2021
I will purchase more. A real professional. Thanks!